Experimenting With The Lens Attaching Macro Jar

Experimenting With The Lens Attaching Macro Jar

OK, not exactly the most skittish subject in the universe but I wanted to have a play with the Lens Attaching Macro Jar I made and this was literally the only live critter I could find. It’s cold over here at the moment! I’d hoped he’d pop his head out but he flatly refused, unfortunately. This experiment made me understand some of the limitations of the jar but also some of the possibilities. Firstly, this isn’t an easy piece of equipment to use and it certainly would require a lot of practise to make it work in the field. The basic problem is if a small insect was sitting on the bottom of the jar or to the far left or right, the lens will not see it. The sweet spot is about an inch in from the end and as near to the centre as possible and raised about 15-20mm; focusing is then very easy. That said, if you can accustom yourself to popping in some foliage or stones that sit in about the right place and hope that whatever you put in there will eventually alight on them, then you’ve a chance of getting some great shots. It’s going to require some patience, though and in the field it’s yet to be seen if I’ll be able to get any decent shots at all. The upside, however, is if you can lure the critter to approximately the right area of the jar, creating stunning backdrops is a piece of cake and the reflections were actually quite pleasing and not too difficult to control. In the above shot, I just popped a pink dog blanket in front of the jar and voila. In the field, having a few coloured hankies in the bag or pocket would facilitate some very pleasing effects, indeed. That’s on the pre-text you can get the bug where you want him with his thumbs up, saying cheese.